10 Signs of Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease

Difficulty finding the right words

Initiating or joining in on conversations may appear difficult. Conversations may randomly be paused in the middle, as you or a loved one may forget how to finish a sentence.

Because of this, repetitive conversations can occur. You may have difficulty finding the right words for specific items.

Misplacing items often

You or a loved one may begin putting items in unusual places. It may become more difficult to retrace the steps to find any lost items. This may lead you or a loved one to think that others are stealing.

Difficulty making decisions

Financial choices may demonstrate poor judgment. This symptom often causes detrimental financial effects. An example of this is donating large amounts of money to telemarketers.

Physical hygiene also becomes less of a concern. You or a loved one may experience a rapid decline in bathing frequency and a lack of willingness to change clothing on a daily basis.

Withdrawing from work and social events

As symptoms appear, you may notice that you or a loved one becomes increasingly withdrawn from common social events, work projects, or hobbies that were previously important. Avoidance can increase as the symptoms worsen.

Experiencing personality and mood changes

Extreme swings in mood and personality may occur. A noticeable change in moods may include:

  • confusion
  • depression
  • anxiety
  • fearfulness

You may notice that you or your loved one is increasingly irritated when something outside of a normal routine takes place.

The exact cause of early onset AD hasn’t been fully determined. Many researchers believe that this disease develops as the result of multiple factors rather than one specific cause.

Researchers have discovered rare genes that may directly cause or contribute to AD. These genes may be carried from one generation to the next within a family. Carrying this gene can result in adults younger than 65 years old developing symptoms much earlier than expected.

These genes are estimated to be the cause of less than 5 percent of diagnoses. Research is ongoing at this time

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